Search

South West Peregrine

Cornwall & Devon Peregrine Falcon Study Group since 2007

Tag

Nature

Peregrine Ringing

Test1.png
Roger working on the deceptively large ledge

Sunday 4th June, another three young were colour ringed along with the metal BTO rings; this was a tricky site to reach, but the ledge was large enough to allow the ringing to go ahead in-situ.

Peregrine Falcon Ringing 2017 from South West Peregrine on Vimeo.

This is a fourth consecutive season the pair have bred  and over that period 11 Chicks have all been raised to fledging. The ringing carried out under licence and with landowners permission went once again without a hitch, due to good teamwork and planning the climb in advance.

A Barn Owl update

An update on the Barn Owl and a few more pics from Steve Johnson

barn3

After a couple of weeks of rough weather, rain & wind it did make me wonder how the Owl would be fairing; not much of an opportunity to hunt lately. It does make you wonder how they exist, their life (as with many other animals) is continually on a knife edge, but survive they must and indeed they do.

With the first break in the weather I went out at my usual time, parked up and prepared the camera, I looked around saw nothing, I then went to a mid point spot and looked to the left side of the scrub……and there it was hunting across the field , I took position and waited, it wasn’t long before it began to fly towards me, stopping short it settled on a fence post it was looking at me but didn’t seem to be bothered, if at all interested.

barn5

I watched it for a good hour, I also thought I saw another Barn Owl but it was only a glimpse so not 100% but fingers crossed for a pairing. The light was dropping so I thought it was time to go, just as I thought that the Owl started to fly straight at me in fact it went right over my head as I was taking photos of it, it then went across the path to another field I followed it but when I looked over the hedge it was gone. It was a great hour spent watching such a beautiful bird.

barn2

All Images Steve Johnson

Falcon, protecting her young from the Devonshire summer rains.

A short sequence taken from Bushnell camera trap footage, over an hours period in June 2016, Devon, UK.

The Falcon does her best to protect three young chicks from a summer downpour. Weather play’s a huge part in the young’s survival; however with a good food source, and a well drained ledge, all three went onto successfully fledge in July.

This was this particular Falcons third successful breeding season, now having reared eight young in total.

A drenched Peregrine Falcon – Summer 2016 from South West Peregrine on Vimeo.

Difficult climb is worth the efforts

Wednesday the 1st of June 2016, saw the ringing team back on the clifftops of North Cornwall at a particular tricky coastal site. A first attempt to climb was aborted,due to some technical issues. After a very difficult climb, the second assault proved a major success. Three very healthy eyasses bagged up in spite of only one adult being present for the past two weeks. The young birds were now at 25 days of age, slightly older than the desired ringing age by a day or so, but due to the their location on a very large ledge it was not a problem for the experienced team. They were a  bit of challenge to handle and ring, however the team prevailed. All three healthy young Peregrines, were then returned safely to their ledge some 100  feet below the cliff top. The adult male was soon back to inspect the goings on and in due course feed the ravenous young.

SWP would like to thank Chris Adams for photographing the team and allowing us to use his images on this post.

Helping with Buzzard Project

Roger Finnamore  of SWP gets his hands on some young Buzzards (Buteo buteo), he takes up the story

‘The Peregrine is obviously the core species of our field work, that said however, we do have other strings to our bow. The 1st of June, and I had kindly been invited to meet with George Swan. George has been carrying out a colour ringing project on Buzzards, the venue a large estate in mid Cornwall. Not quite knowing what to expect, George and I met at the appointed hour. He agreed to do the driving, an interesting journey followed as Cornish hedgerows flashed by. We arrived at the first chosen site and George was soon on his way up a substantial tree. A single chick was found at this site, duly bagged, lowered to the ground  ringed and  swiftly returned to the large stick nest. 

Again at break  neck speed, it was off to the next nest. Concentration of Buzzards took me by surprise and it wasn’t long before we were at the foot of our next nest. This nest held two much larger chicks,these were weighed, measured, ringed and returned. A completely new experience for myself; getting introduced to a new species a under the watchful eyes of  George was one which I most  definitely would like to repeat. Very many thanks to George for the opportunity’.

Herring Gulls close to fledging, raised by adult Peregrine Falcons

With this latest and likely now to be last update on the Peregrine rearing 3 Herring gulls on the South West coast of England, due to likelihood that the next possible visit they may have fledged. In that scenario it will be near impossible to film due to restrictions on equipment used. However here we see them being closely guarded by their adoptive mother, in all visits she has been very close to the ledge always keeping an eye on them. This visit we saw them feeding or at least picking over the remains of a carcass retrieved and left for them. They are all in good condition and we will endeavour to bring you the outcome of their fate, good or bad.
We hope this has provided interest over these few weeks, although we wish to return to a successful brood of peregrines next year. I’m sure you will all agree nature is marvellous and yet can be strange and still throw us a few surprises now and then.

 

The original witnessing of an event similar in Dorset in June 2001 can be read in the attached document

South Coast Peregrine rearing Herring Gull chicks 2014

One of the joys of studying wild Peregrines (and there are many), is the sense of anticipation as to what one might witness during that next field trip. Such was the case, when we first discovered, and filmed, one of our study pairs raising three Herring Gull chicks.

We had been fortunate, to watch a video of the same behaviour, filmed by talented amateur cameraman P. Chaney having been discovered by R.Baker. This footage was captured on the Dorset coast, but not for one second, did we ever expect to see the same for ourselves.

It was on the morning of May 30th, that we had our first encounter. I was in the company of Steve Watson, a good friend of the group, who had journeyed down from Gloucestershire for a couple of days birding. We arrived at the site, for a routine check on the breeding status of the resident pair. After briefly scanning the home cliff, I located the falcon.She was clearly brooding chicks, as I watched through the scope, my jaw dropped, as the head of the first baby Gull appeared. I turned to Steve, and relayed what i’d seen, he bundled me away from the eyepiece,and after a few seconds he too got his first glimpse. I’ve never heard Steve swear before, but he turned to me and simply uttered a couple of words that i couldn’t possibly repeat here. We watched for a couple of hours, after which we were forced to leave, to fulfil another appointment. We returned in the evening, with both Greg and his camera to capture the first video.

Our next visit to the site, was equally special. The young Gulls are thriving and as you will see in the following footage (which was filmed on the 12th of June), we managed to capture the youngsters being fed by a very confused Peregrine. We hope you are as astonished with what we were fortunate to witness.
Cheers for now
Roger Finnamore

A Pilgrim’s Tail

We have made a few changes to our blog ‘A Pilgrim’s Tail’ as we were rapidly running out of storage space.

So we hope that you enjoy the new layout, it has lots more going on than the old blog and links to many more items of interest to all you Peregrine enthusiasts out there, and from the responses we get there are quite a few of us!

You can view all of our latest post from our own fieldwork and studies, along with the guest posts such as that from Charlie Moores of BAWC.

We have a new Gallery section displaying some lovely images from around this majestic coastline, as well as a link to the YouTube Channel that offers you an insight into watching these birds along our shores.

Image

 

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑